Houston Texans  13
Baltimore Ravens  20

This is another game that pretty much played out exactly as was predicted.  The Ravens play pretty well when at home, while the Texans limped toward the end of the season with three straight losses before pulling out a victory last week against a Bengals team that may have been one of the only other teams in the playoffs with less momentum than the Texans.  Going up against a motivated Ravens defense at home, TJ Yates (183 total yards, 0 TDs, 3 INTs) turned back into a rookie free agent pumpkin, throwing three picks and seemingly incapable of moving his team when it mattered most.  There is definitely no controversy when Matt Schaub returns next season. 


Joe Flacco (175 total yards, 2 TDs) played the role of game manager very well, throwing a few key strikes and not turning the ball over.  If Flacco continues to have a chance to be a game manager and not a game winner, the Ravens can beat any team in the league.

Andre Johnson (8-111) was a huge bright spot for a passing game that had few instances worth mentioning.  AJ proved he’s still an elite talent when healthy, and it doesn’t even matter who’s throwing him the rock; he’ll get his numbers.

Anquan Boldin (4-73, 1 TD) proved that he was over his ailing knee, leading the Ravens in receiving and showing that the bye week was very important for his health.  No other Ravens receivers did anything of note.

No one can say Arian Foster (27 car., 132 yards, 1 TD; 5 rec., 22 yards) didn’t do his job, as he still rolled up over 150 total yards and a score against one of the better run defenses in the league.  Foster should be considered the top pick in the draft next season, probably regardless of format.

The only player that was really disappointing from a fantasy perspective was Ray Rice (21 car., 60 yards; 4 rec., 20 yards).  Rice was probably involved in most every fantasy playoff league, and he was worth very little, as he just could not find any room to get going.  He should do much better against the Patriots next week, and he makes a strong play because of the opponent.