Teams in the NFL are quickly learning that the need for a good running attack has fallen on top of the league’s endangered species list. The recently approved new rule changes will make this task very difficult, so you better be able to throw the football.

With the advent of a pass-happy NFL, defenses will need more hybrid players on the field that can rush the quarterback and still be fast enough to cover speedy receivers downfield. Oregon Ducks defensive end Dion Jordan fits this description perfectly, as he’s a natural athlete.

Here is Dion Jordan’s 2013 NFL draft scouting report:

Strengths

Jordan has tremendous size at 6’6”, 248lbs., and NFL teams will expect him to add-on more weight to his body frame in order to become a more effective pass-rusher. Defensive line coaches will love how he uses his hands to keep blockers away from his body. This technique doesn’t allow Jordan to be steered away from the pocket.

He works well in most defensive schemes, as Jordan has played both the outside linebacker and defensive end positions. Oregon utilize his speed (ran a 4.6 in the 40 last month at the combine) perfectly to defend downfield on certain passing downs.

Weaknesses

NFL teams must remember that Jordan is a “work in progress, “as he will need time and patience to develop his pass-rushing technique. The potential is there for him to be great, but Jordan will need to improve on his first step off the line of scrimmage and utilize his speed and athleticism more to get around pass-blockers.

Jordan must better contain the outside edge on well-disguised misdirection plays. His height will hinder him getting lower when tackling smaller running backs, as Jordan has consistently given up big yardage after the original point of contact.

Durability is a question mark, as he battled through multiple shoulder injuries last season, and recently underwent surgery to repair a torn labrum.

Intangibles

Jordan’s potential is very high, as he could be a dominant pass-rusher for many years to come. A prospective team willing to draft Jordan must afford him time to grow on the football field and in the weight room. They will benefit greatly from his versatility.